Storm window installation is one of the first topics many homeowners usually discuss with their contractor when they feel their home is due for an improvement. Not all homeowners, however, are aware that storm windows are even a choice. If you’re wondering about what they are, this blog post by Woodbridge Home Exteriors should give you a good idea.

What Are Storm Windows?

Storm windows don’t replace your primary windows. They are installed on either side of your primary windows, depending on your choice. Either way, they essentially double your windows, providing extra protection.

Why Should You Install Storm Windows?

This is the big question, because you also have the option of installing new, more energy-efficient replacement windows instead. The common answer has to do with the price tag. Although replacement windows are the best choice for the long term, if you have a limited budget at the moment, storm windows can provide a solution.

Old, broken, inefficient windows are an issue. Storm windows can improve energy efficiency, though not as well as the best replacement windows you’ll find on the market today. However, storm windows cost only a fraction of what new replacements would cost.

Interior or Exterior Storm Windows?

In most cases, the answer is interior storm windows. They cost less to install and also to maintain, because they’re not as exposed to the elements. They provide a seal on the inside of the old windows, so they’re better for energy efficiency especially if they are equipped with Low-E glass. Besides, if you can pay for new exterior storm windows, you can probably add a bit more and get high-performing replacement windows.

Whether you decide to get storm windows or more energy-efficient replacement windows, you can depend on Woodbridge Home Exteriors to provide the best products and services. We also offer siding installation. Call us today at (972) 217-7585 in Texas, (405) 252-1548 in Oklahoma, or (316) 226-8011 in Kansas to talk about improving your home. We work with homeowners in Wichita, Topeka, and Salina, KS.